Focus On: Underwater Macro Photography – 60mm

Following on with my theme of photo posts about the gear I’m selling. For the first of two posts on macro lenses underwater, today I’d like to showcase some of the photos I’ve taken with the 60mm macro + Nikon D300 and give you all some simple general macro tips.

60mm macro lens

60mm macro lens

Equipment:

  • Nikon D300 + Subal Housing for D300 (£2000)
  • 60mm macro lens + Subal flat port (£375)
  • 2 Inon z240 strobes (not for sale)

I still think that the crop sensor DX cameras make the best underwater cameras for macro. People who switch to full frame often struggle with what they found quite simple on DX. I know several professional underwater photographers who moved to full frame for their wide angle shots only and still use the Nikon D300 as their macro set up. And this 60mm is my favourite lens to use. The reason being is it is super fast at auto focus with much less of the “hunting” of some of the newer lenses I’ve used. This is essential when your tiny creature or fish is moving about and you are slightly moving too (we all have to breathe occasionally). The light weight of it is another plus for me personally. I dont have very strong wrists (too much computer work has given me RSI which is the reason I’m selling all this gear and finally moving back to a smaller camera).

Here are some photos from last year (some of these might look very familiar for regular readers of my blog) – click them for larger:

As you can see, you can get very close, in fact I think it would probably focus right on the front of the port (although it would be hard to light a subject that close)! The blue background in this image above is actually starfish skin. This little tiny shrimp lives on the starfish for a free ride.

I love blennies and the quick focus of this set up allowed me to capture this one yawning in 2011.

As well as the capacity for macro the 60mm lens is wide enough for portraits of bigger fish such as this batfish being cleaned:

The 60mm allowed me a closer working distance to this cardinal fish with eggs in his mouth. All the other cardinal fish were hanging around so close that had I tried to take this photo with the 105mm macro there would have been two or three fish between me and him for the same framing.

My top simple tips for macro:
  • Get down to eye level (if you can without damaging the reef), your images will be more full of ye contact and impact.
  • For any critters with eyes try to always make sure eyes are in focus.
  • To get the eyes and mouth in focus, for shallow DOF photos, focus between the eyes and the mouth. It will be in focus 1/3 in front of the focus point and 2/3 behind the focus point.
  • If you find your lens hunts for focus (this one does not but many macro lenses do) when don’t be afraid to switch the camera to manual focus and move the camera back & forth to focus).
  • If your camera allows (most camera these days are fairly customisable), try to have one button access to 100% zoom in on your photo. For example on the D300 I set the middle button (between the arrows) to toggle between 100% and zoomed out for quickly checking eye focus on macro shots with shallow DOF.
  • Check your LCD histogram rather than relying on LCD brightness to check for exposure.
  • Sometimes it’s hard to see the settings in the little screen on the top of a DSLR camera without flattening your subject, on the Nikon D300, the little info button (it looks like a key if I remember correctly) displays that whole screen on the LCD when in shooting mode.

This was one of the first underwater shots I took with my DLSR system in a swimming pool with Martin Edge!

I hope you liked my stroll down memory lane with my 60mm macro set up for the Nikon D300. As I said at the top of the post I’m currently selling that set up. Buy for only £2375 (camera, lens, housing and port)! Click here for more details & the full list of equipment for sale or email me at scubasuzy-sellingnikongear@yahoo.co.uk. Thanks for supporting my work!

Lembeh Underwater Gallery Complete

I’ve finished uploading some of the weird and wonderful creatures you can see in Lembeh straits, in North Sulawesi, Indonesia. Its amazing what the guides find amongst the rubbish in the black volcanic sand! The visibility was not as good as I remember from the previous trip in 2007 but it was certainly great to get back there.

Full gallery here: http://www.pbase.com/suzy_walker/lembeh_strait_indonesia_2009

This was the first few days of the Ultimate Indonesia photo trip with Divequest, lead by Alex Mustard. I’ve started my above water gallery for the whole trip too, although I’ve only loaded the Lembeh photos so far. The topside photos are in this gallery: http://www.pbase.com/suzy_walker/lembeh_strait_and_raja_ampat_indonesia_2009

We stayed in the lovely Lembeh Resort which I managed to snag a few photos of this time…

Its under slightly different management than last time but the food and service are still fantastic.

All photos in this post are clickable but do check out the rest :) Next up Raja Ampat ….

First few Lembeh pics uploaded

Yay, just back from Holidays. We went to Lembeh straits and Raja Ampat in Indonesia.  Just uploaded the first couple of photos from Lembeh Straits, muck diving and macro captial of the world, let me know what you think…

Full gallery here: http://www.pbase.com/suzy_walker/lembeh_strait_indonesia_2009

Trip review and more photos of course to follow :)

How to set up a Subal ND30 – Part three – 105 VR lens

Following on from the how to set up a subal housings parts one and two, part three is just a quick update really..

I have the Subal 105 VR port with manual adjuster knob (for use with the new Nikon 105 VR lens). The port comes with some instructions which I pretty much followed to the letter but here are some brief observations.

  • It turns the opposite way to the 60mm flat port!
  • It uses a slightly thicker oring, be very careful not to mix up your orings. I keep all mine in little resealable sandwich bags with the port size written on the front.
  • You have to attach the lens after the camera is in the housing (because the lens is too fat to fit through the back way). I keep the camera body cap handy so I don’t get any stray dust in my camera whilst I’m fiddling with my housing before I fit the lens.
  • Make sure the lens itself is switched to M/A unless you want to manual focus for the whole dive! As you put the port on its easy to knock that little switch so care is needed.

How to set up the Subal ND30 – Part two – Strobes

As promised this is the long overdue second section about how I personally set up my Subal ND30 (underwater housing for the Nikon D300). I have two Inon Z-240 type 3 strobes and sea-and-sea sync cords. This is how I put mine together. Other makes might be different so you should ask the advice of your dealer. Remember I’m still just a beginner and these instructions are mostly my aid-memoir.

Strobe sync cords.

To connect the strobe to the housing you need a strobe sync cord (or two). I have two different ones depending on if I’m using one strobe or two, but essentially they have the same method to attach.

The small end goes in the camera and the big end into the strobe.

Attaching the sync cord to the camera housing:

1) Take the plastic cover off the small end (and keep it handy)

2) Put the metal ring back on flat side first (I learned the hard way not he leave these metal rings on for storage, mine got salted on and took 3 burly men and a wrench to get it off again).

3) Grease the little blue oring

4) Take the stopper out from one of the flash ports on the housing.

5) The pins go in a certain pattern inside the port and the sync cord so line it up by twisting until it drops into place them push in firmly.

6) Screw the back part of the sync cord (not the metal ring) to tighten

7) Now screw the metal ring for extra tightness.

8) Take the plastic cover and port cover and screw together so they protect each other and stow somewhere safe and out of the way.

Attaching the sync cord to the strobe(s):

1) Take the plastic cover off the large end (and keep it handy)

2) Grease the little blue oring

3) Take the little plastic cover from the sync port on the strobe

4) Line up the little pins and holes in the sync cord and port (mine has a little yellow dot to line up too)

5) Once its dropped into place push down firmly and screw into place.

6) Screw the two little plastic covers together so they protect each other and stow somewhere safe.

I have one single cord for a single strobe and one splitter cord for two strobes so I only ever use one port on my housing. Don’t make the same expensive mistake I made, make sure you grease the orings on the port stopper for the unused port because if the water gets in your port will go rusty and need replacing! If you use two single sync cords I guess you wouldn’t get this problem anyway. When my port when rusty the first I knew about it was when my strobes were behaving very erratically, they were firing seemingly at random and wouldn’t stop for a while after I pressed the shutter, this didn’t happen during my test shots in the hotel, it happened on the dive because the housing was wet and the cord was shorting. I thought my camera was broken! Luckily it all went back to normal after we unplugged the affected strobe port from the little circuit board inside the housing.

See the original post for instructions on how to put together the main subal housing back and 60mm lens port and tokina 10-17 fisheye port.

see part three coming soon for 105VR lens…

Good news and bad news.

Which first? Well the bad news is that I’ve busted my housing already! The good news is I got to go and check out Ocean Optics new store in Basildon.

To all those with ND30s who only use one strobe port. Make sure you grease the Orings and tighten the port cover of the unused side before diving and flooding the port :( Its gone all rusty inside and my strobes were behaving most strangely until I unplug the affected port from the inside electronics.

I’ve taken my baby up to Ocean Optics  so that they can fix it. It’s always worth going to see them in person because they are such great people. Their shop used to be in the Strand (which was great for me since I live in central London) but they’ve expanded out to include the use of the underwater studios at Basildon. They have a great looking deep pool that is heated to almost 30 degrees. Now it’s a tube, a train and a bus to get there but it was worth the trip as I feel my housing is in the best care. Fingers crossed I get it back before our next trip!